Sai Krok Isan (Thai North Eastern Sausage) Recipe

Discover the authentic flavors of Thailand with my Sai Krok Isan (Thai North Eastern Sausage) recipe. Learn to make casing from rice paper and natural hog casing, ensuring your sausages are both traditional and versatile. I’ll also share my grandma’s ingenious method of using an Asian soup spoon to stuff the sausage quickly and efficiently, rivaling any machine at a fraction of the cost.

Sai Krok Isan (Thai North Eastern Sausage)
Sai Krok Isan (Thai North Eastern Sausage)

Is Thai Sausage Sour?

There are a few main types of Thai sausages. The Northern Thai sausage, or Sai Ua, is a bit spicy and very fragrant, with seasonings similar to Thai red curry paste. The North Eastern sausage, or Sai Krok Isan, can have a slight sour kick depending on whether you choose to let it ferment. Most vendors in Thailand sell this sausage with a bit of that distinctive sour flavor. However, keep in mind that it takes at least 24 hours at the room temperature to ferment and start giving the light tangy flavor. Most people leave the sausage to ferment for two days. If you do not want the sour kick, simply let them dry in the fridge over night.

Sai Krok Seasoning
Sai Krok Seasoning

Different Types of Sausage Casings

There are two main types of natural sausage casings: fresh animal and collagen casings. Natural casings are typically the inner mucosa lining of the small intestines of pigs, hogs, or cows. They come packaged with a lot of salt, so it is important to wash them thoroughly inside and out. Then, soak them in room temperature water for at least 30 minutes before use. Natural casings are great for grilling, frying, and baking, but they cannot handle being smoked. Read more about natural casing from worldcasing.com.

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Processed sausage collagen casings are designed for making smoked sausages due to their thicker walls. The heavier the collagen casing, the easier it is to remove. They are perfect for making snack sticks, bologna, and summer sausage. For more details about collagen casings, visit beardbutchers.com.

In this recipe, I will be using the fresh hog casing and rice paper.

Sai Krok Filling and Casing
Sai Krok Filling and Casing

Fat and Lean Meat Ratio for Sausage and Fillings

Regular store-bought sausages contain about 50% fat and 50% lean meat. Therefore, I recommend using ground pork with at least 30% fat to keep the sausages moist while cooking. Without enough fat, the sausages will turn out dry. Pork shoulder or pork butt typically contains 20-30% fat, so I add a bit more pork fat to my sausages. If you are health-conscious, at least use ground pork with a higher fat content.

Making sausage using the machine
Making sausage using the machine

How to Stuff Sausage Using KitchenAid Attachment.

To stuff sausage using the KitchenAid attachment, first attach the sausage stuffer to your KitchenAid mixer according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Prepare your sausage mixture and soak the casings at least 30 minutes. Feed the casing onto the stuffer tube, leaving a few inches hanging off the end. Turn on the mixer at a speed level 4 and gently guide the sausage mixture through the tube, supporting the filled casing as it comes off the attachment. Be careful not to overfill the casing to prevent it from bursting.

How to Stuff Sausage Using a Soup Spoon.

This is my grandma’s method, and it was one of our family’s fun activities. Not only does this method bring back good memories, but it is also efficient and inexpensive. In fact, it takes the same amount of time as using the KitchenAid attachment but requires less cleaning. The Asian spoon has a C shape, allowing more space at the top of the sausage casing. Simply feed the casing onto the spoon and push the meat through the spoon handle, then gently squeeze the filling down the tube. Refer to the picture and video for a visual guide.

Stuffing sausage using Asian spoon
Stuffing sausage using Asian spoon

How to Use Rice Paper for Sausage Casing.

The rice paper trend inspired me to try this, and it works quite well! Simply run water over a sheet of rice paper, place the filling in the middle, and roll it up. Tie each end of the sausage with a butcher twine. Make sure to oil the plate or pan where you will store the sausages and avoid placing them too close together to prevent sticking. Cover them with something ventilated or poke holes in plastic wrap, and let them dry at room temperature for at least 6 hours before cooking. The downside of this method is that it doesn’t work well for grilling or air frying; it’s best for shallow frying or baking.

Using rice paper as casing
Using rice paper as casing

How to Cook and Store the Sausages.

  1. To store uncooked sausage, keep in an air tight container for one to two days. Otherwise keep frozen for up to two months. To make them last longer as use for food storage, you must freeze them on a baking sheet, transfer to a different container, vacuum seal, and freeze for about 6 – 12 months. Make sure to thaw them in the fridge before cooking.
  2. Cooked sausage can last in the fridge up to 4 days.
  3. The best way to cook sausages with rice paper wrappers is by shallow frying them on medium heat for 15 minutes. Another good method is to bake them in a greased pan at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 30 minutes. Other cooking methods can be risky, as the rice paper may stick to the cooking surface.
  4. For sausage in the regular casing, you can air fry at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 15 minutes. Moreover, you can boil the sausage on medium heat for 10 minutes then cook in the pan until you get the desire doneness and chars.
  5. You can also throw sausages straightforward on the grill. However, some may burst. Steaming or boiling the sausages first makes them cook a little faster and prevent the case from bursting.
  6. A safe temperature for pork sausage is 160°F (71°C). Cooking pork sausage to this internal temperature ensures that any harmful bacteria are killed, making it safe to eat. Use a meat thermometer to check the temperature at the thickest part of the sausage to ensure it is fully cooked.
  7. The fresh hog casing can last in the fridge for at least 1 year or longer.
  8. Sai Krok Isan pairs well with sticky rice, pickled ginger, fresh vegetables.
Sai Krok Isan (Thai North Eastern Sausage)

Sai Krok Isan (Thai North Eastern Sausage) Recipe

Mary Thatcher
Discover the authentic flavors of Thailand with my Sai Krok Isan (Thai North Eastern Sausage) recipe. Learn to make casing from rice paper and natural hog casing, ensuring your sausages are both traditional and versatile. I'll also share my grandma's ingenious method of using an Asian soup spoon to stuff the sausage quickly and efficiently, rivaling any machine at a fraction of the cost.
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Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 50 minutes
Course Appetizer
Cuisine asian, Lao, thai
Servings 40 2 inches long sausages

Equipment

Ingredients
  

  • 3 lb ground pork (Pork shoulder)
  • 1 lb pork fat (optional)
  • 20 cilantro roots or stems (from 1 bunch cilantro)
  • cup garlic powder (Or 1 cup minced garlic)
  • 5 tsp ground white pepper
  • 5 tsp sugar
  • 10 tbsp oyster sauce
  • 1 tbsp chicken bouillon (or pork bouillon)
  • 1 bundle bean thread (optional)
  • 2 cups cold cooked rice (optional)
  • 3 – 4 fresh hog casing (Or rice paper)

Instructions
 

Prepare Sausage Casing
  • Rinse: Remove the casings from their packaging and rinse them thoroughly under cold running water to remove the excess salt.
  • Flush: Slide one end of the casing onto the faucet and run cold water through the inside of the casing to flush out any remaining salt and debris. Repeat this process for each casing.
  • Soak : After flushing, soak the casings in fresh cold water for another 30 minutes to ensure they are fully hydrated and pliable.
  • Store or Use: If not using immediately, store the prepared casings in a bowl of cold water in the refrigerator for up to 24 -48 hours. Otherwise, proceed with stuffing your sausages.
Season the Pork
  • Pound or finely chop cilantro roots or stems. Then in a mixing bowl, combine ground pork the seasoning mentioned above include chopped cilantro stems.
Stuff the Sausage. (You can choose from the following methods below.)
  • Using the KitchenAid attachment: To stuff sausage using the KitchenAid attachment, first attach the sausage stuffer to your KitchenAid mixer according to the manufacturer's instructions. Feed the casing onto the stuffer tube, leaving a few inches hanging off the end. Turn on the mixer at a speed level 4 and gently guide the sausage mixture through the tube, supporting the filled casing as it comes off the attachment. Tie at the end of the casing. You can twist to divide each sausage or tie each link with a butcher twine.
  • Using an Asian spoon with hog casing : Feed the casing onto the spoon and push the meat through the spoon handle, then gently squeeze the filling down the tube. Refer to the picture and video for a visual guide.
  • Using rice paper as sausage casing : Run water over a sheet of rice paper and place it on a cutting board or silicone mat. Spoon the filling onto the rice paper or use a ziplock bag with a corner cut off to pipe the filling. Leave at least half an inch of space on each end of the rice paper. Roll the rice paper to form a sausage shape, then tie the ends and between the sausages to form links.
  • Leave the sausages to cure at room temperature overnight or for up to two days. If you are not comfortable leaving the sausages out, place them on a baking sheet to dry in the refrigerator.
Cook and Serve
  • Poke some holes on the sausage if you see some air bubbles. Grill, air fry, or bake the sausage until the internal temperature reaches 160 – 165 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • For sausages that are stuffed in the rice paper, shallow fry or grease the pan, line the sausages in the pan, brush with oil and bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 30 minutes.
  • Serve with sticky rice, pickled ginger, and fresh vegetables such as cucumbers and cabbage. Enjoy!

Video

@stickyricethaikitchen

Sai Krok Isan : Ingredients ⬇️ 3 lb ground pork (Pork shoulder) 1 lb pork fat (optional) 20 cilantro roots or stems (from 1 bunch cilantro) ⅓ cup garlic powder (Or 1 cup minced garlic) 5 tsp ground white pepper 5 tsp sugar 10 tbsp oyster sauce 1 tbsp chicken bouillon (or pork bouillon) 1 bundle bean thread (optional) 2 cups cold cooked rice (optional) 3 – 4 fresh hog casing (Or rice paper) Get full recipe, tips, and more details : www.stickyricethaikitchen.com #sausage#homemadesausage#saikrok#thaifood#laofood#aapi#nana#summer2024#cocina

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Notes

Note 1: I sincerely thank you for visiting my blog and I appreciate you checking out my passion – recipes! If you enjoy these recipes, please share them and leave reviews of ones you try, as it will help the blog continue creating new recipe content. Your recommendation is the highest review I could hope for. Your support means the world to me.
Note 2: Boiling or steaming the sausages for 10 minutes before grilling or frying can help to prevent sausages from bursting.
Keyword sai krok, Thai North Eastern Sausage, Thai Sausage
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